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at film from august of 1963 as demonstration and marchers gathered on the mall here in washington d.c. this was the headline from the washington post, a mammoth rally of 200,000 jamming the mall in a solemn orderly plea for equality. that's our line for those of you over the age of 50. for those of you under the age of 50. 585-3880. 202 is the area code here in washington d.c. we'll get your call on march. >> your calls and comments in a moment. lots get to the other stories this morning that is latest development from syria and headlines from overseas. the guardian newspaper the attack on syria just days away as the house of commons recalled for a vote and the picture of the british prime minster as he departs yesterday as the parliament resuming session tomorrow breaking from their august recess. from the marine herald, -- miami herald, a stage is set. u.s. and allies act as syria's intelligence mount. as u.s. officials said privately that a flood of previously undisclosed intelligence including satellite images and intercepted communication erased last minute administration doubt
of their skin but by the content of their character. i have a dream. >> good morning from washington. it's friday august 23, 2013. i'm chuck todd. this is a special edition of "the daily rundown." we're looking ahead to the 50th anniversary of that famous 1963 march on washington. for many americans, 50 years ago feels like yesterday. but of course for millions of others, including myself who weren't even born yet, in an ironic way, the grand memorial of granite and marble that now stands might make that history feel more distant. particularly for many young people today. we remember dr. king's march as an historical event. through grainy film and archive photos. but for each of us, those four words, "i have a dream," have a different and special renaissanreno sans. since then, every political protest in this country has borrowed from what the leaders of the march on washington for jobs and freedom were able to achieve. tomorrow, thousands will retrace their steps. next week, president obama will mark the 50th anniversary of the march with a speech on the steps of the lincoln memorial. i
company" -- 50 years after the historic march on washington, we go back to the scene with john lewis, who spoke that day half a century ago. where you're standing now, looking out there. that's all the crowd. >> it was good to be in the presence of lincoln. and i feel honored to have an opportunity to come here almost 50 years later. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org. anne gumowitz. the betsy and
warner has the latest on options for action in syria. then we return to the march on washington 50 years on. tonight reflections from the last living speaker, georgia congressman john liu business. >> it was all inclusive it was black and white, latino, asia asian-american and native american. >> they came from idaho, wyoming, and they were there. carrying their signs. >> and we conclude our series on governing in a time of gridlock with a look at how the entertainment world sees the nation's capital. >> the question we ask is if someone is actually getting something done, do the ends justify the means? it is an interesting question to ask when washington is paralyzed by gridlock. >> that is all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by... moving our economy for 160 years, bnsf the engine that connects us. >> and the hewlett foundation working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and this program was made possible by the corporation for pub
georgia. recently, he and i returned to the national mall in washington to remember that day in 1963 and the march that changed america. >> people were all the way down. and you just saw hundreds and thousands of individuals. i'm john lewis, and i was the youngest speaker. ten of us spoke. i spoke number six. dr. king spoke number ten. and out of the ten people that spoke that day, i'm the only one still around. >> congratulations. >> what's that? >> congratulations. >> thank you very much. >> it was a great moment in american life. >> you were his friend? >> yeah. i got to know dr. king. i met him in 1958 when i was 18. but i first heard of him when i was 15 years old in the 10th grade. we worked together. we marched together. we got arrested together in selma, alabama. >> have you ever heard this story before? >> yes, i have. >> you have? >> i watched it on tv. >> you did? >> so you know about the sit-ins? the freedom ride? >> yeah. >> people marching for the right to vote? you know, i was on the march from selma to montgomery. i was beaten. on march 7th, 1965, a group of us, about
on washington with those who lived it. >>> yesterday tens of thousands of americans converged on the nation's capital to commemorate the 50 th anniversary of the 1963 march on washington. it was a historic event that spurred the enactment of the civil rights and voting rights act and one that is now remembered as one of the moral high points of american history. but that is not what political leaders, major media outlets and millions of everyday americans were expecting right up until that march began in 1963. they were bracing for violence and chaos. they were fearing strident and inflammatory rhetoric and they were convinced the main effect of the rally would be to inflict a grievous wound, maybe even a fatal wound, on a very movement it sought to advance. that is the context in which the march took place 50 years ago this week. context that can and all too often is lost to history. it came at a particularly crucial and politically sensitive time in the civil rights movement. three months before the march, in may of 1963, demonstrations in birmingham -- excuse me, demonstrators in birming
approaches this situation is a top priority. "the washington post" published something online that u.s.,s details about the that the budget has grown enormously since 9/11, that the cia is far bigger than outside experts had estimated, that the u.s. is involved in new cyber programs to attack other programs in countries. this information has never been released despite efforts from outside folks. does the president believe this is helpful now and the current climate to have discussion about the details about how the u.s. is spending its money in these departments to get a better understanding, as he said, make the public comfortable with how this money is being spayed and what type of programs are being used? -- that storyhed was published since i walked out here. i'm not in a position to comment on a specific story. the president believes that strengthening public confidence in these programs is important to the success of these programs. there is little debate about the fact these programs are critical to our national security, that they have made a role in protecting the homeland
to make the first march on washington and i never really got over that until president obama said please lead us in the invocation, and that was in january of this year. thank you reverend sharpton and others for asking me to lend a few words to this most precious gatheri gathering as i look out at the crowd, i find myself saying, what are we doing today? where have we come from? what has been accomplished and where do we go from this point forwa forward? i think of one theme that has been played over and over in the past few months and it's one that bring great controversy. stand your ground. and we can think of standing your ground in the negative, but i ask you today to flip that coin and make stand your ground a positive ring for all of us who believe in freedom and justice and equality, that we stand firm on the ground that we have already made and be sure that nothing is taken away from us because there are efforts to turn back the clock of freedom. and i ask you today will you allow that to happen? take the words "stand your ground" in a positive sense. stand your ground in terms
are coming, indeed. ron mott, thank you. "the washington post," as was recognized by the post itself this past weekend barely mentioned the reverend king speech because he was the last speaker. they had gone to to press and it was not really notable to a lot of reporters who were covering it here in washington, d.c. you've been following this from our bureau in washington. all of these reflections of history come together. identify talked to jesse jackson today and he said this is the moment where president obama needs to do what lbj did and set out a legislative mandate for the dream and that voting rights is a constitutional amendment. that's the focus. that and on economic injustice and equality. >> i think it also puts a spotlight on the relationship between presidents like kennedy or president obama and a leader like martin luther king. let's go back to reality. in the sprachk 1963 president kennedy did not want this march to happen. he thought it would get out of control. he thought it might have speakers like john lewis who would go in directions more radical. he kept his deta
. >>> as dawn broke on washington, d.c., 50 years ago today, no one knew what to expect. dr. martin luther king, junior had been up most of the night in his room writing and rewriting the speech he was to give that day, though the most sub lime passage would never appear on that page. the earliest press reports that morning suggested that only about 25,000 people would show up. organizers of the march on washington for jobs and freedom were nervous. putting out fires, working behind the scenes to keep the collision behind the march in tact and preparing to channel the sea of humanity that they hoped to call forth. and then the buses and the trains came, and the people came with them by the thousands. and by that afternoon, more than 200,000 people, black and white spread out before the shadow of the great emancipator, disciplined and skeweding the spirit of solidarity. they listened to speakers one by one who called the nation to meet the demands that justice placed upon it, and about 2:40 in the afternoon, the last speaker rose to the lectern. some fretted the tv cameras would be gone by the t
on anniversary of the march on washington, and the legacy of martin luther king jr.. series, first ladies, influence and image. over the next couple of hours, we will visit places with history curators. away fighting the revolutionary war, martha washington ran their plantation. >> it is clear that martha arrived at mount vernon in 1859 and there was a lot of management that she had to do. when she married george washington, she brings with her to mount vernon 12 housemates. that is really almost unimaginable luxury. these are slaves that are for the most part, not field labor, not producing crops, which is where your income is coming from. they are doing things like cooking, serving at table, clean the house, doing the laundry, doing selling, this is not productive labor in the sense that it is not productive income. she brings them with her and she brings financial resources to the marriage as well as her managerial skills. it makes mount vernon a successful operation and it makes it possible for washington to be away for eight years fighting a war. the fact that he has this support sys
-perry. live this morning from washington, d.c. where thousands of people turned out to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the march on washington for jobs and freedom yesterday. only one man who spoke from the steps of the lincoln memorial five decades ago remains alive today, congressman john lewis, and he spoke forcefully. >> i got arrested 40 times during the '60s, beaten, left bloody and unconscious. but i'm not tired, i'm not weary. i'm not prepared to sit down and give up. i am ready to fight and continue the fight, and you must fight. >> although the architect of the march has passed away, many of the inequities that prompted the struggle remain firmly in place. in 1963 the march called for equal access to jobs, fair wages, unfettered voting rights and intraracial segregation, access to decent health care, schools, housing. half a century later the struggle continues. the struggle continues for decent work and humane conditions that pays a living wage of the nationwide unemployment rate is 7.4%. for african-americans it's 12.6%. for young african-american men between 20 and 24 the u
be the secretary of dhs is the most thankless job in washington. that is not true. no doubt, it is a very big and comics job. it is literally a 24/7 job, that as my successor will soon learn, it is also one of the most rewarding jobs there is. what you do hear matters to the lives of people all across our great nation him and your decisions affect them in direct and tangible ways. you make sure their families are safe from terrorist threats, that their local first responders have equipment and training and funding, and that when disaster strikes people who have lost everything are given food and shelter and hope. and that thanks for that is not owed any single individual or cabinet secretary, but to that 240,000 dhs employees, many of whom work in tough conditions around the clock to accomplish our shared and noble mission, and that includes some who have made the ultimate sacrifice for our country. they are the backbone of your nation's homeland security, and over the past 4 1/2 years, it has been my pleasure to serve with them and build a more agile department of homeland security. i thank
at the 1963 march on washington for jobs on freedom. "he has got the whole world in his hands. >> let us listen please to the words of this song and understand that in the heart of our creator, every soul has the same value and should be valued equally. thank you very much for the opportunity to sing for you. ♪ he's got the whole world in his hands. he's got the whole wide world in his hands. he's got the whole world in his hands. he's got the whole world in his hands. [singing "he's got the whole ♪orld in his hands"] ♪ [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the speaker of the united states house of representatives, the honorable john boehner. >> how about a round of applause? [applause] let me thank my colleagues for their testimonials and express my gratitude to all the members of staff of the congressional black caucus in their assistance planning this ceremony. we have many guests. the mayor is here. our attorney general is here. we want to welcome all of you. right now, i have the distinct honor of introducing a great patriot, the recipient of the presidential medal of freedom, a
were also in washington today to mark this anniversary. >> when i look out over this diverse crowd and survey the guests on this platform, i seemed to realize what otis redding is talking about, and what dr. king preached about, this moment has been a long time coming but a change has come. >> now, it is time for "the last word" with lawrence o'donnell, thank you for joining us, have a great night. >>> 50 years ago tonight, reporters filing stories on a demonstration in washington noted three things. it was peaceful, it was far larger than anyone expected. and a young preacher departed from his planned text. those unplanned sentences have never been forgotten. >> nbc news presents the march on washington. >> i have a dream. >> 50 years later, the dream lives on. >> it was in the middle of battles to break down the walls of apartheid in america. >> martin luther king jr. made a speech, but he also delivered a sermon. >> my father watched from the white house as dr. king and y thousands of others recommitted us to higher ideals. >> injustice is injustice everywhere. >> he gazed at th
on a demonstration in washington noted three things. it was peaceful, it was far larger than anyone expected. and a young preacher departed from his planned text. those unplanned sentences have never been forgotten. >> nbc news presents the march on washington. >> i have a dream. >> 50 years later, the dream lives on. >> it was in the middle of battles to break down the walls of apartheid in america. >> martin luther king jr. made a speech, but he also delivered a sermon. >> my father watched from the white house as dr. king and thousands of others recommitted us to higher ideals. >> injustice is injustice everywhere. >> he gazed at the wall of segregation and saw that the power of love could bring it down. >> martin luther king jr. did not live and die to hear his heirs whine about political grid lock. >> the arc may have bent towards justice, but it doesn't bend on its own. >> for all who are willing to take the flame for justice, i know that flame remains. the tired teacher, the businessman, they are marching. >> we knew fear. the sound of the bells today. let freedom ring everywhere we g
. the march on washington. august 28th, 1963. ♪ >> people of all races, regular people from all walks of life, marching against injustice, marching to change history. >> we are the moral revolution. >> how long? we want our freedom and we want it now. >> a call to ask and a call for peace. a word that inspired a people, a nation and the entire world. >> free at least, free at least. thank god almighty we are free at least. >> tonight a special hour-hour toll particulars nation. the march on washington. the dream continues. >>> good evening. i'm al sharpton live from the lincoln memorial here on the national mall. first years ago hundreds of thousands of people stood where i am right now watching history. millions more watching at home, seeing the leaders of the civil rights movement. call for justice and equality. i talked to him from the exact spot where he can spoke 50 years ago. and we'll hear some of the young people who traveled hundreds of miles to help change the course of history. i'm honored to begin the show tonight with martin luther king iii and reverend joseph lowry, who mean cal
. ♪ [applause] >> thank you. 50 years ago, they did not take a bus outing to come to washington. there will be those that will miscast this as some great social event. but let us remember 50 years ago some came to washington having rode the back of buses. some came to washington that couldn't stop and buy a cup of coffee until they got across the mason dixon line. some came to washington sleeping in their cars because they couldn't rent a motel room. some came to washington never having had the privilege to vote. some came having seen their friends shed blood. but they came to washington so we could come today in a different time and a different place and we owe them for what we have today. [applause] i met a man not long ago, i tell it often, he says i'm african american but i don't understand all this civil rights marching you're talking about, reverend al. i've accomplished, i've achieved. look at my resume. i went to the best schools. i'm a member of the right clubs. i had the right people read my resume. civil rights didn't write my resume. i looked at his resume. i said, y
in the 1963 march on washington remember the events of that day in a discussion hosted by the martin luther king, jr. memorial library in washington, d.c. this is an hour 30 minutes. >> when our archivist suggested that i conduct oral histories with people that attended the march, i jumped at the opportunity to hear firsthand accounts of the days that i, like many of you, had only known about in books, photos and media reflections. i was curious about literal and other journeys that people took to get to the lincoln memorial on that hot august day in 1963. we put out a call for people it into the march to be interviewed and the panelists here today were the first to answer that call. it is important to note that this is the beginning of an ongoing project and derek and our collection not only oral histories but also memorabilia and other artifacts from the march to the washingtonian the community archive. two of the panelists, peter bailey and doctor ella kelly were right under my nose as their regular attendees to the black studies lecture series that takes place in the black study center
think about the march on washington they only think about the dream speech and that part of the speech. they don't think about anything else and you are right. he said a lot harsher things than anyone talked about. this is including the absence of women on the stage on purpose. they even missed the dream part of the speech. they were looking so much for the violence that they did not see it. i'm wondering how they thought, with anyen there, notice that they've missed the story. >> i want to address media coverage on the march on washington and i remember the three major networks were there. withoutered it interruption and they broadcasted it to europe. "the washington post" assign more than 60 reporters to cover that story. it was really big news. a congressman, you said that the civil rights movement without the media would be like a bird without wings. what did you mean? >> i meant that. >> i know you did, but tell us what you meant. without the media, especially in the american south, without reporters, without the photographer, without the cameras to bring the message .nto the livi
anniversary of the march on washington. wasn't it exciting to see the enthusiasm and the film of the people of the day? who could have expected so many of us would be here who had ties to all that was owing on? who could suspect that we would all be with john lewis? [applause] attorney general, mr. mayor, you honor us with your presence. .he fierce urgency of now words rang out across the national mall, the call echoed in households across america. the summons ignited a movement to make real the promise of democracy. of course everyone knows the "i had a dream" speech, but the fierce urgency of now part of it was not only an inspiration, it was a motivation to act. was not the first time dr. martin luther king jr. urged fellow travelers to reject the status quo, to in his words at the march, refuse to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. seven years early now to trim of in francisco, my hometown, 1956, dr. king delivered the same message to the delegates of the naacp convention. --said "now i realize those all over are telling us we must slow up, he said, but we cannot afford this slo
which found the unemployment rate went up in 28 state and declined in eight states. "washington journal" is next. >> the president's plan to try to keep college more affordable is already getting some reaction from capitol hill. we might have to weigh in. some are in support and some are critical saying the new ranging system that the president put out is arbitrary. meantime college can cost up to $30,000 year on average now for some folks and the debt load students carrying can be the same amount. with that background is the cost of college worth it? that's the question for you this friday morning. republicans call 202-585-3881, democrats 202-585-3880 and independents 202-585-3882. look forward to your calls and also your participation by social media. you can send us a tweet at twitter @c-span wj. you can also send an e-mail journal@c-span.org. is the cost of college worth it? allen writes, it used to be but right now it slightly losing steam. now people that are caught with a minimum of expectations while being strapped with a new burden of paying back the loan making short m
, that is the future we must move toward no matter where it is. tom foreman, cnn, washington. >>> hello, again, a look at our top stories now. in california, a raging wildfire is exploding in size and spreading inside the yosemite national park. it has been 50 years on the east coast since martin luther king jr. made his famous speech and thousands today are gathering on the washington mall to secelebre that historic event and marian berry joining us live later on this hour. in california, a wildfire is burning almost out of control through parts of the state. the rim fire is burning so fast, it has doubled in size in a day. the fire has also spread to the western edge of the park. nick has been following developments for us. >> reporter: fred, is sun has come up here and it's given us a fresh perspective of how devastating the fire has been. this goes back a couple hundred yards at least and it's going things like this, scorching the earth and singeing the edges. at least 126,000 acres burned and it's been very unforgiving in its pattern. you see here, fire completely jumped over this road, scorched
>> rose: welcome to the program. august 28, 2013, marks 50th anniversary of the march on washington, and the famous speech by dr. martin luther kino congressman johning with, who with dr. king. progress. back in 1963, charlie, let me tell you, i s that said white waing, colored waiting, those signs are gone. we passed the civil rights bill. we passed the voting right act, the fair housing act. and when people say to me nothing has checked. i say come dalk in my scooz. >> we talk with jonathan rider, isabelle wilkerson, and clarence jones. >> the march was nmy view, the culminn ofio 100 years of frustration and despair. 1963 began with the centennial, the 100th anniversary of the emancipation proclamation. and that means that when these people came together, those quarter of a million people came together, they were in some ways representing all the hopes and dreams that had idea yt to be fulfull fulfilled. >> rose: the 50th anniversary of the march on washington next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we be
in washington, d.c., where events are already underway for the 50th anniversary march on washington. thousands of people are gathered here already, with more continuing to stream in. among those scheduled to speak today are martin luther king iii, merly evers williams, the reverend al sharpton, attorney general eric holder, and john lewis. the only person to speak at the original march who is still alive today. here he is in 1963. >> by the forces of our demand, our determination, and our numbers, we shall splinter the segregated south into a thousand pieces and put them together in the image of god and democracy. we must say, wake up, america! wake up! for we cannot stop and we will not and cannot be patient. >> on that day, 50 years ago, 250,000 people gathered here to demand the rights of full citizens. they demanded comprehensive civil rights legislation, school desegregation, full employment, living wages, and the aggressive use of federal authority to ensure economic political and social justice. 50 years later, we have made progress, was the struggle continues for those same demands. we
of the march on washington. we'll take you there live. >>> and 184,000 acres burned. plus, 4,000 firefighters equals one of the worst wildfires in california state history. we're going to have a live report. this is "cnn newsroom." u.s. officials are all but telling u.n. inspectors to get out of syria, get out of the way. it is not and if, but when the u.s. will launch an attack. the u.n. teams are carrying on. inspectors back to evidence for the alleged chemical attack. these pictures were posted online showing inspectors talking to survivors at a medical facility near damascus. u.s. warships, they are ready, but there are warnings here at home and around the world that the united states could create inextricable mess by conducting a military strike on syria. cnn is the only u.s. network broadcasting live from inside of the country, inside syria. fred pleitgen is on the ground in damascus with the very latest. fred, essentially what is it like to be there with people thinking and believing that a strike is imminent? >> well, i have to tell you, people really do seem to be nervous here. there
material, in connection with the speech he gave on the march on washington, i had provided him with a summary of ideas and summary of language that he had previously discussed. so it wasn't as if i was providing him with some creative ideas that were solely mine. i was more like a secretary who was summarizing and putting in the form that could be used for the speech, the opening paragraphs, little did i know, until i was sitting listening to him, i was standing some 50 feet behind him, when i was listening very carefully, i said, oh, my god, i guess he decided to use those opening paragraphs. to those paragraphs, which constituted the first seven paragraphs. to those opening paragraphs, he seemlessly added his own additional paragraphs, and it was when he was speaking his own additional paragraphs that he was interrupted from the written speech that he had prepared. and he was interrupted by mahalia jackson who shouted to him, tell him about the dream, martin. tell him about the dream. most people don't know that the speech which is so frequently celebrated over the years, the
this country and to mark the 50th anniversary of the march on washington, and the good saturday afternoon to you, everyone. i am craig melvin coming live from the feet of the lincoln memorial continuing our coverage. we heard speech from civil rights and political leaders ranging from attorney general eric holder of course here and house speaker -- house minority leader nancy pelosi and the families of trayvon martin and of course martin luther king iii scheduled to join us at some point here over the next hour or so, and again right now thousands about to start retracing the steps that marchers took 50 years ago. so has peter alexander who is along the march route and let me start with you. what is the scene like right now? >> so right now we're along the route on independence avenue and you can see the police are clearing the way as they arrive here at the martin luther king memorial. we are joined by so many people who witnessed history as we wait to see those who participated in it, one of those voices is the gentleman i met today named franklin delano, no roosevelt, but williams. you
on washington? >> the purpose of it was jobs. but what was behind that and what was the revelation for me was how much and everything dr. king did was really all about education. was all about education. he was locked in on that and when that group went into the white house and talked with the president, president kennedy said and this is reported by brandt, that the kind of influence you have in the black community you really ought to emphasize schools and getting your kids to do well in schools. >> i am struck mostly by how different things are now. the technology is such a you can get a flash mob to show up if you want but 1963 you get 200,000 people back to the mall and you would be below horned. organizing was remarkable and that to me -- i would like people to understand the enormity of that. >> a very short time a group of people came together because they believe in something. and they put together the most unbelievable moment in american history. >> on the march on washington to go forward but the young people who want to be journalists tuesday that they have an obligation to cov
goose bumps. and you can't help but become emotional. the mall in washington today is packed with people from all over the country. thousands of people who made this journey on the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. the national mall is filled. you can see the reflecting pool and the monument in the background. then over my shoulder, the lincoln memorial where we have been hearing performances all day which will culminate with the president of the united states. the first african-american president giving his speech on the anniversary. i am don lemon, everyone. we're going to hear from three presidents this afternoon. former president jimmy carter will speak. as well as former president bill clinton will speak here as well. then, of course, president barack obama. plus, civil rights icon, congress n congressman john lewis, the only surviving speaker from the 1963 march on washington will deliver his remarks. first we'll hear from superstar oprah winfrey. oprah is scheduled to speak any minute now. we wait for oprah winfrey and others to take to the podium, and they will begin t
, straight-forward news". "accurate, responsible" says the washington post. and the baltimore sun says, "instantly engaging and powerful". al jazeera america, there's more to it. make sure that stories don't escape them. >> every day a storm of views. how can you fully understand the impact unless you heard angles you hadn't considered. consider this, antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo. stories that matter to you. saudi arabia for that. ♪ test test .. . .. . but should you be made aware if you are consuming them. that's next on "consider this." welcome back to al jazeera. members of congress are being briefed right now about syria. >> possibly to start the end of this week, about now. now things look so very different. the loyal britt whose have stood by the americans in iraq, and afghanistan will not be onboard, this time. so obama has to decide, i think, whether to go it alone with perhaps the support of the french. and it looks like there's no way he is going to have a u.n. security council mandate. i think part of the parliamentary debat
. >> no decision yet in washington but a clear message that there is a case for a military strike. >> if we are saying, in a clear and decisive, but very limited way, we send the crop -- a shot across the bow saying stop doing that that could have a positive impact on our national security in the long term and may have an impact in the terms that chemical weapons are not used again on civilians. >> a limited strike is in the cards, but could be later rather than sooner. there is pressure on washington to wait until you and inspectors on the ground have made their reports -- until you and inspectors -- until u.n. inspectors on the ground have made their reports. a majority is in doubt and house of commons -- in doubt in the house of commons. the government has had the following line with opposition demands. >> the motion they're putting for tomorrow reflects the prime minister's recognition -- the notion we are putting forward -- the motion we are putting forward tomorrow reflects the prime minister's recognition -- >> and it is not just certain british m.p.'s who doubt the choice of a stri
here before. >> yeah. >> in washington, why not give the weapons inspectors the amount of time that they need? >> well, you're right. the white house and administration officials have essentially made the point moot as far as the any of the inspectors. it's interesting, because one week ago today, it was one week ago today, that is when that attack occurred outside damascus. initially after that, the president was still hesitant to engage in any military action against syria. this has been going on for two and a half years, the length of that civil war. he talked the need for a mandate and operating under the structures of international law. everyone is waiting for the intelligence report. we understand that there are meetings ongoing among the president and top advisers. the intel report is going to have to be declassified for release to the american people. there are indications that tomorrow could be the day we see that. mean time, we have gone from the president on thursday saying a u.n. mandate was necessary to yesterday, the vice president saying there is no doubt that th
anniversary of the march on washington. david martin and holly williams on the countdown to an attack on syria. scientists discover a brain protein that improves memory. dr. jon lapook has the study. a cbs news poll out tonight reveals how much america is changing on race. and memories of the march from the foot soldiers who were there. icons of civil rights on what is left to be done. >> the future is in your hands, in your heart, in your mind. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley reporting tonight from washington. ing tonight from wash >> pelley: good evening. today the president commemorated one momentous event-- the march on washington-- as he contemplated another: a possible military strike on syria. we're going to start tonight with the 50th anniversary of the march and dr. martin luther king's i have a dream speech. president obama stood as dr. king did at the lincoln memorial and addressed a crowd of thousands gathered on the national mall. he paid tribute to those who had marched a half century earlier demanding jobs and freedom. >> on the battl
canceled his meeting with russian president vladimir putin. that is all next on "washington journal." ♪ is sunday,orning, it august 11 come up 20 13. it is today, resident obama began his week long vacation at martha's vineyard. today we will be discussing the state of u.s. relations with dive intoking a deep u.s. job numbers, and talking about recent al qaeda threats. before we do that we want to hear about the state of news media from our viewers. the pew research center's -- you research center released its biannual data and while there is still plenty of criticism about the industry, most americans continue to believe the media plays an important watchdog role. as we take you through that reports this morning, we want to hear your thoughts. he of us a call. we split our lineup -- we split our lines up by age group. you can also catch up with us on all of your favorite social media sites, on twitter and facebook. you can also e-mail us at .ww.c-span.org we want to take you to that report that was released on thursday by the pew research center for the people. public valuations
that changed america forever. the march on washington. august 28th, 1963. people of all races, regular people from all walks of life marching against injustice, marching to change history. a day when the voices of the movement echoed across america. >> we are of a massive moral revolution. >> how long can we be patient? we want our freedom and we want it now. >> a call to action and a call for peace. the words that inspired a people, a nation, and the entire world. >> free at last, free at last, thank god almighty we are free at last. >> tonight, a special two-hour edition of "politicsnation." the march on washington. the dream continues. >> good evening. i'm al sharpton live from the lincoln memorial here on the national mall. 50 years ago hundreds of thousands of people stood where i am. right now watching history. millions more watching at home seeing the leaders of the civil rights movement, call for justice and equality. powerful speeches and powerful music from singers like lahalia jackson, bob dylan. tonight we'll hear those voices. we'll also hear from congressman john lewis. i talk t
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